Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

Psychodynamic psychotherapy.

As one of the most popular forms of treatment around, psychodynamic psychotherapy is up there with the most commonly used kinds of treatment for all manner of common issues. More importantly, though, psychodynamic psychotherapy is a regularly misunderstood and undervalued form of treatment. It’s a type of therapy that is built mainly on the works of the famous Sigmund Freud. Freud came up with the school of thought which is broadly known as psychoanalysis, and so much of this is built on what he developed in the past.

It’s a very powerful form of therapy that offers you all manner of insights into how our thoughts influence behaviour. The unconscious feeds a lot of the things we do, and often plays a role in any unconscious actions that we undertake. This can often lead to various issues. Including disturbances in your day-to-day thinking and how you react to certain situations.

Mainly, psychodynamic psychotherapy is built around the concept of looking at issues that may have taken place during childhood. This is because many major incidents that happened in our lives that shapes who we are as adults began as children. This means that with the help of a once-per-week therapy programme, many people can undergo a long-term change to the way that their previous experiences influences future actions.

This is all very useful for making sure you can gain a greater insight into where your primary limitations exist, and how unconscious actions can lead to influencing mental wellness.

The history of psychodynamic psychotherapy.

This platform grew hugely in popularity following the works of Sigmund Freud. In the late 1800s, his work helped to create a whole new understanding of the meaning of what our subconscious feeds our conscious actions. It started alongside Jean-Martin Charcot, who was working on using a hypnotherapy solution to treat women suffering from hysteria. Alongside his friend Josef Breuer, the development of psychodynamic psychotherapy became possible.

They used this treatment first on a young woman who was known as Anna O. Anna suffered from hysteria, and simply talking to her about her experiences helped her to begin to unravel the problem and unwind the issue at hand that made her feel so scared in the first place. This kept developing, and before long formed into the famous “talk therapy” that we all know and love so much today.

How, though, does the process work?

How does psychodynamic psychotherapy work?

Psychodynamic psychotherapy often works simply by giving the victim or the patient the chance to talk, open up and be honest. Often, this is the first time that they can do so in a scenario whereby there is no judgement or advice given. They simply are allowed to talk and to talk themselves into finding the solution to the very problem that they face.

This often leads to a major change in their mentality and their belief that a solution can be found and the problem overcome. It’s for this reason that psychodynamic psychotherapy is such a popular kind of treatment.

It helps to make sure that the therapist will simply look to find the major patterns that reoccurring issues that pop up throughout the day. This helps to make sure that the difficulty can be spotted, and that a problem is solved by coming up with a solution tailored to that particular problem.

The benefits of this kind of therapy are clear, including:

  • Making sure that you can enjoy a much more positive sense of approach to dealing with problems as life goes on.
  • You will also be able to make a positive change to the way that you feel about your individual symptoms, making it easier to see a pathway to a happier, brighter future.
  • You will get to enjoy a new means of solving the problems without any bias or judgement being added to the situation and thus fuelling the fire.

However, it’s important to note that, like any other kind of treatment, there are potential problems and downsides. Many times, clients will be in therapy for many years and this means making a long-term commitment. This form of psychodynamic psychotherapy is a long-term ask; if you are not willing to keep coming back, it may be hard to get the quality of treatment that you would want. If you are ready to put the work in, though, psychodynamic psychotherapy can be among the most powerful forms of therapy around.

 

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